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ADHD – Synergy Neurofeedback
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ADHD Tag

Neurofeedback Research from November 2018

Neurofeedback versus psychostimulants in the treatment of children and adolescents with ADHD

Neurofeedback for ADD and ADHDA recent systematic review that included eight randomized controlled trials that compared neurofeedback treatment to treatment with medications. Outcome measures included behavioral assessments by parents and teachers, self-reports, neurocognitive measures, and EEG measurements. The results were favorable, showing improvement in objective and subjective measures of ADHD. Neurofeedback was also able to decrease medication dosages.

Recent Developments in Neurofeedback

Meta-analysis Confirms Sustained Effects of Neurofeedback for ADHD

March 6, 2018- In this study with over 500 children, researchers compiled data comparing the results of neurofeedback for ADHD. An international group of researchers carried out the study, which used different control groups to disambiguate their findings, including one for medication, and another for non-activity. Research from 10 other randomized studies was compiled, and 6 month follow ups were made to assess the long term effectiveness of the treatments.

“Given treatment with medication in ADHD is effective in short-term symptom management, and clinical benefit is likely to diminish after sustained use for more than 2 years, there is a need for treatments that result in better long-term benefits.” -Sustained effects of neurofeedback in ADHD: A systematic review and meta-analysis

The study found that neurofeedback was an effective treatment for ADHD  and produces durable effects over a 6-month period following treatment, positioning neurofeedback as a “promising treatment with long-term benefit.”

Neurofeedback: News and Research Review May 2017

Neurofeedback: News and Research Review May 2017 Here are some recent developments in neurofeedback we would like to keep you informed of. It's been an exciting month in this fast- developing field. Can neurofeedback help you think your way out of depression? Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School...

NEW BOOK: Child Decoded: Unlocking Complex Issues in Your Child’s Learning, Behavior or Attention

Child Decoded: Unlocking Complex Issues in Your Child's Learning, Behavior or Attention Paperback – February 16, 2017 by Marijke Jones (Author), Robin E. McEvoy PhD (Author), Kim Gangwish (Author)Recently our own Dr. Steve Rondeau published a chapter in an exciting new book by primary authors Marijke Jones , Robin E. McEvoy PhD , and Kim Gangwish, entitled “Child Decoded: Unlocking Complex Issues in Your Child’s Learning, Behavior or Attention” and published in February of 2017.

You can pick up a copy on Amazon.com, or have a look at a few chapters before you decide with their “look inside” function”.

Here is the author’s introduction to the book:

 

Neurofeedback- An Evidence-Based Scientific Approach to Mental Health

Neurofeedback is a non-invasive, evidence- based psychotherapy that allows patients to train their own brains to improve various functions. Evidence- based psychotherapy or medicine is defined by the NIH (National Institute of Health) as follows:

“Evidence based medicine (EBM) is the conscientious, explicit, judicious and reasonable use of modern, best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients. EBM integrates clinical experience and patient values with the best available research information.” (1)

An EEG readout used for neurofeedback Neurofeedback uses qEEG technology (brain mapping) to measure a patient’s brain waves, and then engages them in dynamic brain training to normalize levels, correlating to improvements in function in that area. Research on wave signatures of individual neurological disorders such as ADD or traumatic brain injury (TBI) has helped specialists identify with great accuracy patterns of brain dysfunction, and researchers have used this much larger pool of data to develop specific neurofeedback protocols to benefit or reverse each individual neurological condition.

During a neurofeedback session, patients play simple games in which they are rewarded for changes in their own brain wave patterns through visual feedback. Adjusting brain wave patterns to optimal levels is a skill the patient learns intuitively, and success allows for progress in the game. Eventually patients develop much greater internal control of their psycho-emotional or behavioral issues, and neurological disorders can be corrected or at least greatly improved.

Neurofeedback- a Treatment for Autism Spectrum Disorders

neurofeedback for autism

photo credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/57570482@N06/

On March 27, 2014, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released new data on the prevalence of autism in the United States. This surveillance study identified 1 in 68 children (1 in 42 boys and 1 in 189 girls) as having autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

From the National Institute for Mental Health (NIHM):

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is the name for a group of developmental disorders. ASD includes a wide range, “a spectrum,” of symptoms, skills, and levels of disability.

People with ASD often have these characteristics:

  • Ongoing social problems that include difficulty communicating and interacting with others
  • Repetitive behaviors as well as limited interests or activities
  • Symptoms that typically are recognized in the first two years of life
  • Symptoms that hurt the individual’s ability to function socially, at school or work, or other areas of life

Some people are mildly impaired by their symptoms, while others are severely disabled.[1]

Traditional therapies are limited to medication and behavioral therapy, both of which can provide some assistance with the wide range of challenges someone on the spectrum of autism might encounter. Neurofeedback has shown great promise as a tool to help patients on the spectrum with various symptoms, including speech, motor and sensory integration issues, and sociability.

Neurofeedback Goes Mainsteam

Neurofeedback Neurofeedback- the Future of Mental Health Care?

The future of mental health care may be very different from the current model, if brain based treatment modalities like neurofeedback could be integrated into or replace the current best practices in the field. Instead of taking a pill or doing talk therapy, you can now train your brain to be healthier through playing something like a video game.

Neurofeedback patients are asked to play a video game, where they are rewarded for self regulating their brains. When the optimal brain wave levels are reached, the plane in the game (for example) will fly above the ground instead of crashing. Repeating this process can lead to long-lasting changes in brain activity.

As neuroplasticity is more thoroghly understood, brain training is becoming more sought after, as people seek to make permanent changes to their brain phisiology to effect greater changes in their performance, well being and even spiritual development. Using neurofeedback, patients can now put their brain through a series of exercises to strengthen areas that are showing suboptimal brain wave patterns, and bring them into the normal range, thus alleviating symptoms.

Evidence Neurofeedback has Gone Mainstream

According to Newsweek magazine, Neurofeedback has gone mainstream.

The promise of neurofeedback is to shift our brain waves back to health without drugs, exercise or even meditation. Clients suffering from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, anger or depression can simply sit in a comfortable chair for half-hour sessions with a few wires protruding from their scalp and get a mental tune-up, if not a complete rewiring of an off-kilter brain.

-from Newsweek 5/9/16 

Harvard University published a blog in October of 2017 entitled “Brain training: The future of psychiatric treatment?“. This article is a useful explanation of neurofeedback designed for the layman. Among other things, the usefullness of neurofeeback for ADHD is touted:

“Interestingly, studies have shown that neurofeedback training as a therapy for ADHD may be even more effective than the standard medication (Methylphenidate/Ritalin) used to treat this disorder.”

-Harvard Graduate School Feb 2, 2017

Neurofeedback is a computer-aided training method in which the patient’s own brain activity can be monitored and improved. It has been shown to successfully help patients overcome a variety of neurological and behavioral disorders including ADD, PTSD, Traumatic brain injury, and many more.

Neurofeedback- A Cutting Edge ADHD Treatment

neurofeedback for ADHDAttention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most commonly diagnosed childhood neurological disorder. Children with ADHD are hyperactive and have low impulse control, and may have trouble paying attention.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as many as 11 percent of children in the United States have been diagnosed with ADHD.

Neurofeedback is a therapy that is increasingly being used to treat ADHD. It is non-invasive and free from side effects, unlike the medications commmonly used to treat this disorder, such as dextroamphetamine (Adderall), or methylphenidate (Ritalin).