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Neurofeedback Blog – Page 2 – Synergy Neurofeedback
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Neurofeedback Blog

Neurofeedback News and Research May 2018

Cal State San Bernardino publishes a study on Neurofeedback and PTSD with very positive results

One in five veterans returning from active combat has symptoms of PTSD. PTSD symptoms can include agitation, hostility, hypervigilance, self-destructive behavior, social isolation, flashbacks, severe anxiety, depression, and insomnia. It is notoriously hard to treat- the most promising therapy up until now in the world of conventional medicine has been CBT (Cognitive Behavioral Therapy).

In this recently published study, veterans with PTSD experienced significant improvements in well-being. Initially 80 percent of the veterans were experiencing severe to moderate levels of distress. Following neurofeedback treatment, 78 percent of them reported positive levels of well-being.

“Overall the findings support artifact-corrected neurofeedback as a clinically-effective intervention that helps improve some of the impairments associated with PTSD and that specific improvements in auditory attention and processing speed can contribute to greater well-being.” -Cal State San Bernadino

Read more

Time course of clinical change following neurofeedback

A recent study, by combining data from two ongoing neurofeedback studies, has found that the symptoms treated with neurofeedback during these studies continue to improve for weeks after the treatment. Most neurofeedback studies stop measuring the therapeutic response after the treatment is over, which could result in skewed results, showing less therapeutic effect.

Recent Developments in Neurofeedback

Meta-analysis Confirms Sustained Effects of Neurofeedback for ADHD

March 6, 2018- In this study with over 500 children, researchers compiled data comparing the results of neurofeedback for ADHD. An international group of researchers carried out the study, which used different control groups to disambiguate their findings, including one for medication, and another for non-activity. Research from 10 other randomized studies was compiled, and 6 month follow ups were made to assess the long term effectiveness of the treatments.

“Given treatment with medication in ADHD is effective in short-term symptom management, and clinical benefit is likely to diminish after sustained use for more than 2 years, there is a need for treatments that result in better long-term benefits.” -Sustained effects of neurofeedback in ADHD: A systematic review and meta-analysis

The study found that neurofeedback was an effective treatment for ADHD  and produces durable effects over a 6-month period following treatment, positioning neurofeedback as a “promising treatment with long-term benefit.”

The Treatment of Insomnia with Neurofeedback

Insomnia- An Epidemic in the Modern World

In the modern world, there are all manner of influences that might be disruptive to a normal sleep cycle. We over consume stimulants like caffeine and sugar. Our biological system is constantly under assault from electromagnetic frequencies from wifi networks and cell phone radiation. We are exposed to pollution to varying degrees. The stress level in general is high.

As a result, many of us fail to get adequate sleep at night. Insomnia has currently reached epidemic status in the developed world. Recent estimates of the prevalence of insomnia according to data analysis studies show us that almost 1/3 of the US population suffers from some form of sleep disturbance.

Modern medicine falls short of adequately helping insomniacs. All it can offer is sedatives or hypnotics, two classes of drugs that can create as many problems as they seek to alleviate. This is where alternative medicine can step in to take up the slack.

Keeping your Brain Young- Neurofeedback for Longevity

With the rising prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases in the modern era, health conscious individuals are researching and applying novel methods to slow the process of cognitive decline and other age-related neurological problems.

Neurofeedback has become one of the go-to therapies being studied and used to slow the natural aging process. Cognitive health in old age goes hand-in-hand with physical health!

Some Brain Games May Grow the Size of Your Brain: Study

As we get older and have perhaps been sustaining years of poor “brain hygiene”, allowing mental habits like stress, anxiety, depression, and insomnia to continue unabated, parts of the brain (like the hippocampus,  which works to consolidate information from short-term memory to long-term memory) can actually atrophy, often causing mild cognitive impairment (MCI), which puts older people at increased risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease.

Neurofeedback in the Treatment of Migraine Headaches

Headaches can be caused by a myriad of factors, thus making it’s treatment difficult, until causation can be accurately determined. According to Web MD,  there are 150 different types of headaches. The most common ones are tension headaches, migraine headaches, cluster headaches, sinus headaches, and hormone headaches. Common causative factors include illness, stress, diet and environment.

Tension headaches are the most common type of headache, affecting a broad spectrum of the population, and can often be resolved by removing the causative stimulus and/or taking ibuporofen or some other anti-inflammatory medication. These type of headaches often don’t necessitate the sufferer seeking medical attention.

migraine headache is an intensely painful headache that affects some 29 million Americans. Doctors don’t know exactly what causes migraines, although it is known that some type of trigger occurs and subsequently creates inflammation in the cerebral blood vessels. They can last from a few hours to up to several days and also tend to be recurring over time. Sensitivity to light and nausea are common accompanying symptoms. In addition to illness, stress and diet, other possible triggers include pollution, noise, lighting, and weather changes. 90% of migraine headaches run in families, so there is often an epigentic or genetic factor at work as well.